Title

Report: Security-Migration Nexus To what extent have the Global Compacts onRefugees and Migration contributed to theestablishment of a global regime focused onhumanitarianism or securitization?An examination of the impact of the preparation andimplementation of the GCM and GCR in Central andSouth America

Date of Publication

2021 12:00 AM

Security Theme

Migration

Keywords

Border Management, Trafficking, Liberal governance, Mexico and Central America, South America, Detention, Regional Coordination

Description

this working paper provides an alternative perspective on how to pursue a human-rights centred approach to migration governance during periods of intense strain drawing on two similar regions with established regimes. this paper also makes an important academic contribution. It speaks to broader scholarly debates on the securitization and criminalization of migration. While there is a significant body of literature on the tension between security and humanitarian responses to migration in Europe and Australia (discussed in sections 3 and 4 més avall), much less has been written about the extent to which this tension characterizes the governance of migration elsewhere in the world. By focusing on Central and South American cases, therefore, this paper helps to address an important gap in our understanding. To what extent do the GCs focus on economic and security aspects of migration governance led to the dilution of the human rights emphasis of the two regional regimes?

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Report: Security-Migration Nexus To what extent have the Global Compacts onRefugees and Migration contributed to theestablishment of a global regime focused onhumanitarianism or securitization?An examination of the impact of the preparation andimplementation of the GCM and GCR in Central andSouth America

this working paper provides an alternative perspective on how to pursue a human-rights centred approach to migration governance during periods of intense strain drawing on two similar regions with established regimes. this paper also makes an important academic contribution. It speaks to broader scholarly debates on the securitization and criminalization of migration. While there is a significant body of literature on the tension between security and humanitarian responses to migration in Europe and Australia (discussed in sections 3 and 4 més avall), much less has been written about the extent to which this tension characterizes the governance of migration elsewhere in the world. By focusing on Central and South American cases, therefore, this paper helps to address an important gap in our understanding. To what extent do the GCs focus on economic and security aspects of migration governance led to the dilution of the human rights emphasis of the two regional regimes?