Date of Publication

2021 12:00 AM

Security Theme

Health

Keywords

health, human rights, abuse, mental health, forced migration, Bangladesh, Rohingya refugees

Description

Importance: At the end of August 2017, violence and persecution in Myanmar's Rakhine state forced nearly 1 million Rohingyas to flee to Bangladesh for their lives and seek shelter. Many refugees, after their traumatic experiences leaving Myanmar, experience mental health problems. Objectives: To identify the prevalence of posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSSs) among displaced Rohingya adults and investigate the association of predisplacement abuse and postdisplacement factors with PTSSs. Design, setting, and participants: This cross-sectional analysis from a household survey of 1184 Rohingya adults aged 18 years or older was conducted in 8 refugee camps within Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, from September 17, 2019, to January 11, 2020. Main outcomes and measures: The Impact of Event Scale-Revised was used to assess PTSSs. The possible range of scores was 0 to 88; moderate PTSSs were classified using a score cutoff of 33 to 38 and severe PTSSs were classified using a score cutoff of 39 and above. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) were estimated using a multivariable logistic regression model adjusted for potential confounders. Results: Of 1184 participants (625 men [52.8%]; mean [SD] age, 35.1 [13.4] years), 552 (46.6%) had severe PTSSs, and 274 (23.1%) had moderate PTSSs. In Bangladesh, refugees are not legally permitted to work in refugees camps, but 276 of 1165 respondents (23.7%) had temporary paid jobs. Moreover, 113 of the 276 working participants (40.9%) and 430 of the 889 nonworking participants (48.4%) reported severe PTSSs. A total of 496 respondents (41.9%) reported inadequate humanitarian aid for their families, and among them, 281 (56.7%) reported severe PTSSs. A total of 136 of 1177 respondents (11.6%) experienced both physical and sexual abuse in Myanmar, and 87 (64.0%) of them had severe PTSSs. The multivariable analysis showed a reduced risk of PTSSs with appropriate humanitarian assistance (aPR, 0.50; CI, 0.38-0.65). Experiencing both physical and sexual abuse before displacement had a significant association with PTSSs (aPR, 2.09; CI, 1.41-3.07). Opportunities for paid employment in refugee camps also reduced the risks of PTSSs (aPR, 0.69; CI, 0.52-0.91).

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Predisplacement Abuse and Postdisplacement Factors Associated With mental Health Symptoms After Forced Migration Among Rohingya Refugees in Bangladesh

Importance: At the end of August 2017, violence and persecution in Myanmar's Rakhine state forced nearly 1 million Rohingyas to flee to Bangladesh for their lives and seek shelter. Many refugees, after their traumatic experiences leaving Myanmar, experience mental health problems. Objectives: To identify the prevalence of posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSSs) among displaced Rohingya adults and investigate the association of predisplacement abuse and postdisplacement factors with PTSSs. Design, setting, and participants: This cross-sectional analysis from a household survey of 1184 Rohingya adults aged 18 years or older was conducted in 8 refugee camps within Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, from September 17, 2019, to January 11, 2020. Main outcomes and measures: The Impact of Event Scale-Revised was used to assess PTSSs. The possible range of scores was 0 to 88; moderate PTSSs were classified using a score cutoff of 33 to 38 and severe PTSSs were classified using a score cutoff of 39 and above. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) were estimated using a multivariable logistic regression model adjusted for potential confounders. Results: Of 1184 participants (625 men [52.8%]; mean [SD] age, 35.1 [13.4] years), 552 (46.6%) had severe PTSSs, and 274 (23.1%) had moderate PTSSs. In Bangladesh, refugees are not legally permitted to work in refugees camps, but 276 of 1165 respondents (23.7%) had temporary paid jobs. Moreover, 113 of the 276 working participants (40.9%) and 430 of the 889 nonworking participants (48.4%) reported severe PTSSs. A total of 496 respondents (41.9%) reported inadequate humanitarian aid for their families, and among them, 281 (56.7%) reported severe PTSSs. A total of 136 of 1177 respondents (11.6%) experienced both physical and sexual abuse in Myanmar, and 87 (64.0%) of them had severe PTSSs. The multivariable analysis showed a reduced risk of PTSSs with appropriate humanitarian assistance (aPR, 0.50; CI, 0.38-0.65). Experiencing both physical and sexual abuse before displacement had a significant association with PTSSs (aPR, 2.09; CI, 1.41-3.07). Opportunities for paid employment in refugee camps also reduced the risks of PTSSs (aPR, 0.69; CI, 0.52-0.91).

 
 

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