Radially rotating miniature heat pipes for turbine blade cooling applications

Jian Ling, Florida International University

Abstract

Aerospace turboengines present a demanding challenge to many heat transfer scientists and engineers. Designers in this field are seeking the best design to transform the chemical energy of the fuel into the useful work of propulsive thrust at maximum efficiency. To this aim, aerospace turboengines must operate at very high temperatures and pressures with very little heat losses. These requirements are often in conflict with the ability to protect the turboengine blades from this hostile thermal environment. Heat pipe technology provides a potential cooling means for the structure exposed to high heat fluxes. Therefore, the objective of this dissertation is to develop a new radially rotating miniature heat pipe, which would combine the traditional air-cooling technology with the heat pipe for more effective turboengine blade cooling. ^ In this dissertation, radially rotating miniature heat pipes are analyzed and studied by employing appropriate flow and heat transfer modeling as well as experimental tests. The analytical solutions for the flows of condensate film and vapor, film thickness, and vapor temperature distribution along the heat pipe length are derived. The diffuse effects of non-condensable gases on the temperature distribution along the heat pipe length are also studied, and the analytical solutions for the temperature distributions with the diffuse effects of non-condensable gases are obtained. Extensive experimental tests on radially rotating miniature heat pipes with different influential parameters are undertaken, and various effects of these parameters on the operation of the heat pipe performance are researched. These analytical solutions are in good agreement with the experimental data. ^ The theoretical and experimental studies have proven that the radially rotating miniature heat pipe has a very large heat transfer capability and a very high effective thermal conductance that is 60–100 times higher than the thermal conductivity of copper. At the same time, the heat pipe has a simple structure and low manufacturing cost, and can withstand strong vibrations and work in a high-temperature environment. Therefore, the combination of the traditional air-cooling technology with the radially rotating miniature heat pipe is a feasible and effective cooling means for high-temperature turbine blades. ^

Subject Area

Engineering, Mechanical

Recommended Citation

Ling, Jian, "Radially rotating miniature heat pipes for turbine blade cooling applications" (1999). ProQuest ETD Collection for FIU. AAI9929540.
https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/dissertations/AAI9929540

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