The impact of social comparison processes on hoped-for possible selves, self-regulatory processes, and mental health outcomes in young adults

Rebecca Ann Wang, Florida International University

Abstract

In exploring the role of social influences in the development of the self, the current study evaluated whether young adults use social comparisons in developing their hoped-for possible selves and, if so, whether their developmental process correlates with self-regulatory processes and positive mental health outcomes. The current study found the following: (1) the domains of hoped-for possible selves among young adults were related to the gender of the social comparison target, (2) the direction of young adults' social comparison processes (upward or downward) did not significantly influence self-regulatory processes (self-efficacy and outcome expectancy) toward achieving their hoped-for possible selves, (3) strong masculine gender identification related to greater outcome expectancy, while strong feminine gender identification related to both greater self-efficacy and outcome expectancy, and (4) self-efficacy related to less state anxiety, trait anxiety, and depression, while outcome expectancy related only to less trait anxiety. Males and females were found to use traditional gender role identification in forming their hoped-for possible selves.^

Subject Area

Psychology, Social|Psychology, Developmental|Psychology, General

Recommended Citation

Wang, Rebecca Ann, "The impact of social comparison processes on hoped-for possible selves, self-regulatory processes, and mental health outcomes in young adults" (2012). ProQuest ETD Collection for FIU. AAI3554222.
https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/dissertations/AAI3554222

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