Effects of commuting and mode of transportation on performance, affect, cardiovascular activity, and frustration tolerance

Steve Matthew White, Florida International University

Abstract

It was hypothesized that making a commute elevates blood pressure, causes negative affect, reduces frustration tolerance, and impairs performance on simple and complex cognitive tasks. This hypothesis was tested by varying choice and type of commute in an experiment in which 168 volunteers were randomly assigned to one of six experimental conditions. The behavior of subjects who drove 30 miles or rode on a bus for the same distance were compared with the reactions of students who did not commute. Multivariate analyses of variance indicated that subjects who made the commute showed lower frustration tolerance and deficits on complex cognitive task performance. Commuting also raised pulse and systolic blood pressure. Multivariate analyses of covariance (MANCOVA) were performed in an effort to identify physiological and emotional reactions that may mediate these relations. No mediational relationships were uncovered. ^

Subject Area

Health Sciences, Mental Health|Economics, Labor|Psychology, Industrial

Recommended Citation

White, Steve Matthew, "Effects of commuting and mode of transportation on performance, affect, cardiovascular activity, and frustration tolerance" (1997). ProQuest ETD Collection for FIU. AAI1386968.
https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/dissertations/AAI1386968

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