Document Type

Event

Keywords

sensorimotor-function, active repositioning, audio/visual biofeedback

Description

Context: Clinicians use exercises in rehabilitation to enhance sensorimotor-function, however evidence supporting their use is scarce.

Objective: To evaluate acute effects of handheld-vibration on joint position sense (JPS). Design: A repeated-measure, randomized, counter-balanced 3-condition design.

Setting: Sports Medicine and Science Research Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: 31 healthy college-aged volunteers (16-males, 15-females; age=23+3y, mass=76+14kg, height=173+8cm).

Interventions: We measured elbow JPS and monitored training using the Flock-of-Birds system (Ascension Technology, Burlington, VT) and MotionMonitor software (Innsport, Chicago, IL), accurate to 0.5°. For each condition (15,5,0Hz vibration), subjects completed three 15-s bouts holding a 2.55kg Mini-VibraFlex dumbbell (Orthometric, New York, NY), and used software-generated audio/visual biofeedback to locate the target. Participants performed separate pre- and post-test JPS measures for each condition. For JPS testing, subjects held a non-vibrating dumbbell, identified the target (90°flexion) using biofeedback, and relaxed 3-5s. We removed feedback and subjects recreated the target and pressed a trigger. We used SPSS 14.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL) to perform separate ANOVAs (p<0.05) for each protocol and calculated effect sizes using standard-mean differences.

Main Outcome Measures: Dependent variables were absolute and variable error between target and reproduced angles, pre-post vibration training.

Results: 0Hz (F1,61=1.310,p=0.3) and 5Hz (F1,61=2.625,p=0.1) vibration did not affect accuracy. 15Hz vibration enhanced accuracy (6.5±0.6 to 5.0±0.5°) (F1,61=8.681,p=0.005,ES=0.3). 0Hz did not affect variability (F1,61=0.007,p=0.9). 5Hz vibration decreased variability (3.0±1.8 to 2.3±1.3°) (F1,61=7.250,p=0.009), as did 15Hz (2.8±1.8 to 1.8±1.2°) (F1,61=24.027, p<0.001).

Conclusions: Our results support using handheld-vibration to improve sensorimotor-function. Future research should include injured subjects, functional multi-joint/multi-planar measures, and long-term effects of similar training.

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Acute Effects of Neuromuscular-Training with Handheld-Vibration on Elbow Joint Position Sense

Context: Clinicians use exercises in rehabilitation to enhance sensorimotor-function, however evidence supporting their use is scarce.

Objective: To evaluate acute effects of handheld-vibration on joint position sense (JPS). Design: A repeated-measure, randomized, counter-balanced 3-condition design.

Setting: Sports Medicine and Science Research Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: 31 healthy college-aged volunteers (16-males, 15-females; age=23+3y, mass=76+14kg, height=173+8cm).

Interventions: We measured elbow JPS and monitored training using the Flock-of-Birds system (Ascension Technology, Burlington, VT) and MotionMonitor software (Innsport, Chicago, IL), accurate to 0.5°. For each condition (15,5,0Hz vibration), subjects completed three 15-s bouts holding a 2.55kg Mini-VibraFlex dumbbell (Orthometric, New York, NY), and used software-generated audio/visual biofeedback to locate the target. Participants performed separate pre- and post-test JPS measures for each condition. For JPS testing, subjects held a non-vibrating dumbbell, identified the target (90°flexion) using biofeedback, and relaxed 3-5s. We removed feedback and subjects recreated the target and pressed a trigger. We used SPSS 14.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL) to perform separate ANOVAs (p<0.05) for each protocol and calculated effect sizes using standard-mean differences.

Main Outcome Measures: Dependent variables were absolute and variable error between target and reproduced angles, pre-post vibration training.

Results: 0Hz (F1,61=1.310,p=0.3) and 5Hz (F1,61=2.625,p=0.1) vibration did not affect accuracy. 15Hz vibration enhanced accuracy (6.5±0.6 to 5.0±0.5°) (F1,61=8.681,p=0.005,ES=0.3). 0Hz did not affect variability (F1,61=0.007,p=0.9). 5Hz vibration decreased variability (3.0±1.8 to 2.3±1.3°) (F1,61=7.250,p=0.009), as did 15Hz (2.8±1.8 to 1.8±1.2°) (F1,61=24.027, p<0.001).

Conclusions: Our results support using handheld-vibration to improve sensorimotor-function. Future research should include injured subjects, functional multi-joint/multi-planar measures, and long-term effects of similar training.