Mindmapping as an adult learning notetaking strategy to increase the encoding of information in a corporate training course

Rita Sabina Mehegan, Florida International University

Abstract

A study was conducted to investigate the effectiveness, as measured by performance on course posttests, of mindmapping versus traditional notetaking in a corporate training class. The purpose of this study was to increase knowledge concerning the effectiveness of mindmapping as an information encoding tool to enhance the effectiveness of learning. Corporations invest billions of dollars, annually, in training programs. Given this increased demand for effective and efficient workplace learning, continual reliance on traditional notetaking is questionable for the high-speed and continual learning required on workers.^ An experimental, posttest-only control group design was used to test the following hypotheses: (1) there is no significant difference in posttest scores on an achievement test, administered immediately after the course, between adult learners using mindmapping versus traditional notetaking methods in a training lecture, and (2) there is no significant difference in posttest scores on an achievement test, administered 30 days after the course, between adult learners using mindmapping versus traditional notetaking methods in a training lecture. After a 1.5 hour instruction on mindmapping, the treatment group used mindmapping throughout the course. The control group used traditional notetaking. T-tests were used to determine if there were significant differences between mean posttest scores between the two groups. In addition, an attitudinal survey, brain hemisphere dominance survey, course dynamics observations, and course evaluations were used to investigate preference for mindmapping, its perceived effect on test performance, and the effectiveness of mindmapping instruction.^ This study's principal finding was that although the mindmapping group did not perform significantly higher on posttests administered immediately and 30 days after the course, than the traditional notetaking group, the mindmapping group did score higher on both posttests and reported higher ratings of the course on every evaluation criteria. Lower educated, right brain dominant learners reported a significantly positive learning experience. These results suggest that mindmapping enhances and reinforces the preconditions of learning. Recommendations for future study are provided. ^

Subject Area

Education, Adult and Continuing|Education, Educational Psychology

Recommended Citation

Rita Sabina Mehegan, "Mindmapping as an adult learning notetaking strategy to increase the encoding of information in a corporate training course" (January 1, 1996). ProQuest ETD Collection for FIU. Paper AAI9717538.
http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/dissertations/AAI9717538

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