A study of moderating influences of adolescent alcohol drinking conditioned by perception of peer alcohol drinking

Douglas Rugh, Florida International University

Abstract

Despite a long history of prevention efforts and federal laws prohibiting the consumption of alcohol for those below the age of 21 years, underage drinking continues at both a high prevalence rate and high incidence rate. The purpose of this research study is to explain underage drinking of alcohol conditioned by perception of peer drinking. An acquisition model is conjectured and then a relationship within the model is explained with a national sample of students. From a developmental perspective, drinking alcohol is acquired in a reasonably ordered fashion that reflects the influences over time of the culture, family, and peers. The study measures perceptions of alcohol drinking during early adolescence when alcohol use begins the maintenance phase of the behavior. The correlation between drinking alcohol and perception of classmate drinking can be described via social learning theory. Simultaneously the moderating effects of grade level, gender, and race/ethnicity are used to explain differences between groups. Multilevel logistic regression was used to analyze the relations. The researcher found support for an association between adolescent drinking and perceptions of classmate drinking. Gender and grade level moderated the relation. African-Americans consistently demonstrated less drinking and less perception of classmate drinking than either whites or other students not white nor African-American. The importance of a better understanding of the process of acquiring drinking behaviors is discussed in relation to future research models with longitudinal data. ^

Subject Area

Social Work

Recommended Citation

Rugh, Douglas, "A study of moderating influences of adolescent alcohol drinking conditioned by perception of peer alcohol drinking" (2005). ProQuest ETD Collection for FIU. AAI3169470.
http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/dissertations/AAI3169470

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