The field of Communication Sciences & Disorders focuses on evaluation, treatment, and research in human communication and related disorders. At Florida International University, the graduate program in the Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders (CSD) in the Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing and Health Sciences (NWCNHS) is a 6-semester program leading to a Master of Science degree in Speech-Language Pathology (MS-SLP). The Department also offers a Graduate Certificate in Communication Sciences and Disorders to complete the required prerequisite courses.

This CAA accredited program provides a unique bilingual emphasis and prepares graduates to work with the increasing number of bilingual individuals in need of specialized care. This bilingual competency will be a critical advantage for speech-language pathologists as the country's minority population continues to grow in the coming decades.

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Submissions from 2016

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The Evolutionary Concept of “Preadaptation” Applied to Cognitive Neurosciences, Alfredo Ardilla

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Why Broca's Area Damage Does Not Result in Classical Broca's Aphasia, Alfredo Ardilla, Byron Bernal, and Monica Rosselli

Submissions from 2015

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A Proposed Neurological Interpretation of Language Evolution, Alfredo Ardilla

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Broca's area network in language function: a pooling-data connectivity study, Byron Bernal, Alfredo Ardilla, and Monica Rosselli

Submissions from 2014

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Language and Visual Perception Associations: Meta-Analytic Connectivity Modeling of Brodmann Area 37, Alfredo Ardilla, Byron Bernal, and Monica Rosselli

Submissions from 2013

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Correlates of HIV Acquisition in a Cohort of Black Men Who Have Sex with Men in the United States: HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 061, Beryl A. Koblin, Kenneth H. Mayer, Susan H. Eshleman, Lei Wang, Sharon Mannheimer, Carlos del Rio, Steven Shoptaw, Manya Magnus, Susan Buchbinder, Leo Wilton, Ting-Yuan LI, Vanessa Cummings, Estelle Piwowar-Manning, Sheldon D. Fields, Sam Griffith, Vanessa Elharrar, Darrell Wheeler, and HPTN 061 Protocol Team

Submissions from 2009

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Brain abnormalities in dyslexic subjects, Aníbal Puente, Virginia Jiménez, and Alfredo Ardilla