Title

Chechnya after the war and the reconstruction process: a stable country or the Kremlin's next failure?

Date of Publication

2018 12:00 AM

Security Theme

Political Stability

Keywords

Chechnya, Ramzan Kadyrov, Russia, Islamisation, Chechenisation, democracy, security, human rights

Description

Chechnya is a strategic country for Russia because it is located in the North Caucasus, a region considered at the same time a barrier and a bridge between Europe and Asia. Since the collapse of the Soviet Union Chechnya and the entire North Caucasus have been affected by political, sociocultural and economic problems exploded in local con- flicts and insurgency. This paper firstly gives an overview of the Russian – Chechen relations during the last centuries with the purpose to understand the roots of the prob- lems that caused the conflict. Successively, this article investigates Ramzan Kadyrov’s leadership and management of Chechnya and tries to answer the question if a stable and authoritarian regime such as that imposed in the Chechen Republic is better than a failing democratic process. Also, this paper aims at establishing if Chechnya after the war and the reconstruction process could be considered a stable country or the Kremlin’s next failure.

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Chechnya after the war and the reconstruction process: a stable country or the Kremlin's next failure?

Chechnya is a strategic country for Russia because it is located in the North Caucasus, a region considered at the same time a barrier and a bridge between Europe and Asia. Since the collapse of the Soviet Union Chechnya and the entire North Caucasus have been affected by political, sociocultural and economic problems exploded in local con- flicts and insurgency. This paper firstly gives an overview of the Russian – Chechen relations during the last centuries with the purpose to understand the roots of the prob- lems that caused the conflict. Successively, this article investigates Ramzan Kadyrov’s leadership and management of Chechnya and tries to answer the question if a stable and authoritarian regime such as that imposed in the Chechen Republic is better than a failing democratic process. Also, this paper aims at establishing if Chechnya after the war and the reconstruction process could be considered a stable country or the Kremlin’s next failure.