Title

The Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing Index

Date of Publication

2019 12:00 AM

Security Theme

IUU Fishing

Keywords

IUU fishing, fisheries index, fisheries resources, fisheries sector

Description

Incentives for illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing are considerable given the financial benefits that can accrue in both largeand small-scale fishing operations, and in developed and developing countries alike. IUU fishing is a major threat to the sustainable exploitation of the world’s fisheries resources. The negative impacts of IUU fishing are environmental through its depleting effect on fish stocks; fisheries management is impacted by impairing scientific research; and it has profound social and economic impacts on communities, those working in the fisheries sector, and consumers. Many actions have been taken at international, regional and national levels to reduce IUU fishing. Indicator 14.6.1 of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), related to SDG 14 ‘Life Below Water’, isdedicated to measuring achievements made towards the ambitioustarget of eliminating IUU fishing by 2020. There are no reliable estimates of IUU fishing covering all countries and using a standardized methodology to generate comprehensive and reliable figures of volumes and values for IUU fish catches. Doing so would be impossible with any degree of reliability, given the clandestine nature of IUU fishing, the fact that one methodology may not fit all circumstances, and the multiple assumptions that would have to be made. However, the lack of a robust basis by which countries can be benchmarked – regarding both their exposure and response to IUU fishing – poses a problem for those in government, regional fisheries management organizations, donors and civil society in seeking to identify where interventions are most needed. This IUU Fishing Index has been developed to address this need. For all 152 coastal countries of the world, a score is calculated based on a suite of 40 indicators. These relate to the prevalence of IUU fishing in each country, and their vulnerability and response to it, drawing on various coastal, flag, port, and other state responsibilities. The scores do not indicate a measure of the volume or value of the IUU fish catch, but they do indicate a standardized measure of performance related to the 40 indicators included in the Index. he Index therefore provides a measure of the degree to which states are exposed to and effectively combat IUU fishing.

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

The Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing Index

Incentives for illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing are considerable given the financial benefits that can accrue in both largeand small-scale fishing operations, and in developed and developing countries alike. IUU fishing is a major threat to the sustainable exploitation of the world’s fisheries resources. The negative impacts of IUU fishing are environmental through its depleting effect on fish stocks; fisheries management is impacted by impairing scientific research; and it has profound social and economic impacts on communities, those working in the fisheries sector, and consumers. Many actions have been taken at international, regional and national levels to reduce IUU fishing. Indicator 14.6.1 of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), related to SDG 14 ‘Life Below Water’, isdedicated to measuring achievements made towards the ambitioustarget of eliminating IUU fishing by 2020. There are no reliable estimates of IUU fishing covering all countries and using a standardized methodology to generate comprehensive and reliable figures of volumes and values for IUU fish catches. Doing so would be impossible with any degree of reliability, given the clandestine nature of IUU fishing, the fact that one methodology may not fit all circumstances, and the multiple assumptions that would have to be made. However, the lack of a robust basis by which countries can be benchmarked – regarding both their exposure and response to IUU fishing – poses a problem for those in government, regional fisheries management organizations, donors and civil society in seeking to identify where interventions are most needed. This IUU Fishing Index has been developed to address this need. For all 152 coastal countries of the world, a score is calculated based on a suite of 40 indicators. These relate to the prevalence of IUU fishing in each country, and their vulnerability and response to it, drawing on various coastal, flag, port, and other state responsibilities. The scores do not indicate a measure of the volume or value of the IUU fish catch, but they do indicate a standardized measure of performance related to the 40 indicators included in the Index. he Index therefore provides a measure of the degree to which states are exposed to and effectively combat IUU fishing.