Location

Peru

Date of Publication

2019 12:00 AM

Keywords

illegal timber, illegal logging Peruvian Amazon, Forest Transport Permits (GTFs), Forest Resources and Wildlife Monitoring Agency (OSINFOR), high-risk authorizations, Peruvian Government Officials, srhreports, illegallogging

Description

This document analyzes domestic trade as well as the export sector, based on information contained in 1,024 Forest Transport Permits (GTFs) issued in June, July, and August of 2017. It examines results and files prepared by the Forest Resources and Wildlife Monitoring Agency (OSINFOR), the entity in charge of supervising and auditing logging areas. The findings reveal that illegal logging continues at an alarmingly high rate. Moreover, high-risk authorizations continue to be concentrated in local forests, private lands, and indigenous communities. This document focuses on the public sector’s role in the proliferation of illegal logging and its related trade in Peru. This analysis assumes that human error does not account for cases in which over 40 percent of the trees approved for harvest never existed in the authorized areas. The report concludes with a series of concrete recommendations for Peruvian State entities, forestry companies, and financial institutions, that aim to generate meaningful changes that reduce illegal logging and promote legally extracted wood in Peru.

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Authorized to Steal: Organized CrimeNetworks Launder Illegal Timber from the Peruvian Amazon

Peru

This document analyzes domestic trade as well as the export sector, based on information contained in 1,024 Forest Transport Permits (GTFs) issued in June, July, and August of 2017. It examines results and files prepared by the Forest Resources and Wildlife Monitoring Agency (OSINFOR), the entity in charge of supervising and auditing logging areas. The findings reveal that illegal logging continues at an alarmingly high rate. Moreover, high-risk authorizations continue to be concentrated in local forests, private lands, and indigenous communities. This document focuses on the public sector’s role in the proliferation of illegal logging and its related trade in Peru. This analysis assumes that human error does not account for cases in which over 40 percent of the trees approved for harvest never existed in the authorized areas. The report concludes with a series of concrete recommendations for Peruvian State entities, forestry companies, and financial institutions, that aim to generate meaningful changes that reduce illegal logging and promote legally extracted wood in Peru.

 
 

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