Date of Publication

2019 12:00 AM

Security Theme

Health

Keywords

srhreports, health, Chagas disease, Latin America, healthcare access, health systems, infectious disease, health disparity, tropical disease, neglected tropical disease, Trypnosoma cruzi, health technology access

Description

Introduction: Chagas disease, caused by infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, represents a huge public health problem in the Americas, where millions of people are affected. Despite the availability of two drugs against the infection (benznidazole and nifurtimox), multiple factors impede their effective usage: (1) gaps in patient and healthcare provider awareness; (2) lack of access to diagnosis; (3) drug toxicity and absence of treatment algorithms to address adverse effects; (4) failures in drug supply and distribution; and (5) inconsistent drug efficacy against the symptomatic chronic stage. Areas covered: We review new approaches and technologies to enhance access to diagnosis and treatment to reduce the disease burden. We also provide an updated picture of recently published and ongoing anti-T. cruzi drug clinical trials. Although there has been progress improving the research and development (R&D) landscape, it is unclear whether any new treatments will emerge soon. Literature search methodologies included multiple queries to public databases and the use of own-built libraries. Expert opinion: Besides R&D, there is a major need to continue awareness and advocacy efforts by patient associations, local and national governments, and international agencies. Overall, health systems strengthening is essential to ensure vector control commitments, as well as patient access to diagnosis and treatment.

Comments

Originally published in Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and is not altered, transformed, or built upon in any way

Share

 
COinS
 
Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Strategies to encance acess to diagnosis and treatment for Chagas disease patients in Latin America

Introduction: Chagas disease, caused by infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, represents a huge public health problem in the Americas, where millions of people are affected. Despite the availability of two drugs against the infection (benznidazole and nifurtimox), multiple factors impede their effective usage: (1) gaps in patient and healthcare provider awareness; (2) lack of access to diagnosis; (3) drug toxicity and absence of treatment algorithms to address adverse effects; (4) failures in drug supply and distribution; and (5) inconsistent drug efficacy against the symptomatic chronic stage. Areas covered: We review new approaches and technologies to enhance access to diagnosis and treatment to reduce the disease burden. We also provide an updated picture of recently published and ongoing anti-T. cruzi drug clinical trials. Although there has been progress improving the research and development (R&D) landscape, it is unclear whether any new treatments will emerge soon. Literature search methodologies included multiple queries to public databases and the use of own-built libraries. Expert opinion: Besides R&D, there is a major need to continue awareness and advocacy efforts by patient associations, local and national governments, and international agencies. Overall, health systems strengthening is essential to ensure vector control commitments, as well as patient access to diagnosis and treatment.

 
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.