Date of Publication

2021 12:00 AM

Security Theme

Health

Keywords

COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, World Health Organization, epidemiology

Description

Since its emergence, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been responsible for more than 170 million cases and 3.5 million deaths. During December 2020 the Comirnaty (BNT162b2 mRNA, BioNTech-Pfizer, Mainz, Germany/New York, United States (US)) vaccine was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and shown to be 95% efficacious in preventing symptomatic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Clinical and real-world data demonstrated 95% effectiveness of the mRNA- based vaccine against the original SARS-CoV-2 and the Alpha variant. Since December 2020, several SARS-CoV-2 variants have emerged and were classified by the World Health Organization (WHO) as variants of concern (VOC): Alpha (Phylogenetic Assignment of Named Global Outbreak (Pango) lineage designation B.1.1.7), first detected in the United Kingdom (UK), Beta (B.1.351) first documented in South Africa [5] and Gamma (P.1) initially detected in Brazil. Most recently, in April 2021, the Delta (B.1.617.2) variant was identified in India and classified on May 11 as VOC due to its fast spread and potential immune escape. Here, we describe the neutralising response of sera from healthcare workers without prior SARS-CoV-2 infection following a second vaccine dose against viral isolates of the Delta VOC, and compared it to the response against isolates of the original, the Alpha, Beta and Gamma VOCs.

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Neutralising capacity against Delta and other variants of concern following Comirnaty vaccination in health care workers, Israel

Since its emergence, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been responsible for more than 170 million cases and 3.5 million deaths. During December 2020 the Comirnaty (BNT162b2 mRNA, BioNTech-Pfizer, Mainz, Germany/New York, United States (US)) vaccine was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and shown to be 95% efficacious in preventing symptomatic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Clinical and real-world data demonstrated 95% effectiveness of the mRNA- based vaccine against the original SARS-CoV-2 and the Alpha variant. Since December 2020, several SARS-CoV-2 variants have emerged and were classified by the World Health Organization (WHO) as variants of concern (VOC): Alpha (Phylogenetic Assignment of Named Global Outbreak (Pango) lineage designation B.1.1.7), first detected in the United Kingdom (UK), Beta (B.1.351) first documented in South Africa [5] and Gamma (P.1) initially detected in Brazil. Most recently, in April 2021, the Delta (B.1.617.2) variant was identified in India and classified on May 11 as VOC due to its fast spread and potential immune escape. Here, we describe the neutralising response of sera from healthcare workers without prior SARS-CoV-2 infection following a second vaccine dose against viral isolates of the Delta VOC, and compared it to the response against isolates of the original, the Alpha, Beta and Gamma VOCs.

 
 

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