Title

A flood risk assessment framework for interdependent infrastructure systems in coastal environments

Author Information

Mohammad Reza Najafi

Date of Publication

2021 12:00 AM

Security Theme

Critical Infrastructure

Keywords

Caribbean, Modeling, Strongest Path Method (SPM)

Description

A framework to combine hydrodynamic modelling with network-based flood risk analysis is proposed. The effects of direct and indirect relationships between infrastructures are considered. The risks in major infrastructures are prioritized to develop effective flood mitigation strategies. Compound flooding driven by multiple marine and hydrologic processes can lead to catastrophic impacts in densely populated coastal environments. Such impacts can propagate through a network of infrastructure systems causing cascading failures. In this study, a network-based framework is proposed to characterize compound flood risks in coastal environments. Pluvial, fluvial and coastal flood characteristics associated with Tropical Storm Matthew (2016) are simulated using a 2D hydrodynamic model over the Island of Saint Lucia. The complex network of infrastructure systems and the corresponding interdependencies are characterized by a risk assessment platform based on the Strongest Path Method (SPM). The model investigates the impacts of direct and indirect connections among infrastructure systems, explores their relative importance in the network and prioritizes the associated risks for more efficient resource allocation. The overall risks are assessed under non-flooding and flooding scenarios and the uncertainties are characterized by sensitivity analysis. Modelling results over Saint Lucia suggests that flood mitigation plans should prioritize the Hewanorra International Airport's backup electricity generators, runway, and taxiway/apron followed by transportation, electricity services, information and communication services. The proposed framework can be applied to study the impacts of compound flood risks on interdependent infrastructure systems in other regions around the world.

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

A flood risk assessment framework for interdependent infrastructure systems in coastal environments

A framework to combine hydrodynamic modelling with network-based flood risk analysis is proposed. The effects of direct and indirect relationships between infrastructures are considered. The risks in major infrastructures are prioritized to develop effective flood mitigation strategies. Compound flooding driven by multiple marine and hydrologic processes can lead to catastrophic impacts in densely populated coastal environments. Such impacts can propagate through a network of infrastructure systems causing cascading failures. In this study, a network-based framework is proposed to characterize compound flood risks in coastal environments. Pluvial, fluvial and coastal flood characteristics associated with Tropical Storm Matthew (2016) are simulated using a 2D hydrodynamic model over the Island of Saint Lucia. The complex network of infrastructure systems and the corresponding interdependencies are characterized by a risk assessment platform based on the Strongest Path Method (SPM). The model investigates the impacts of direct and indirect connections among infrastructure systems, explores their relative importance in the network and prioritizes the associated risks for more efficient resource allocation. The overall risks are assessed under non-flooding and flooding scenarios and the uncertainties are characterized by sensitivity analysis. Modelling results over Saint Lucia suggests that flood mitigation plans should prioritize the Hewanorra International Airport's backup electricity generators, runway, and taxiway/apron followed by transportation, electricity services, information and communication services. The proposed framework can be applied to study the impacts of compound flood risks on interdependent infrastructure systems in other regions around the world.