Faculty Mentor

Dr.Anamika Prasad

Presentation Type

Presentation

Start Date

10-11-2022 3:03 PM

End Date

10-11-2022 3:15 PM

Abstract

Biological structures such as termite nests, silk worm cocoons and honey bee combs integrate material, structure and form to produce biodegradable polymers and composites. Synthetic production of biomaterials through additive or woven processes has failed to achieve comparable material properties to their natural counterparts. For example, cellulose-based biocomposites have markedly less strength and toughness than cellulose micro and nanofibers found in nature. Termites produce a cellulose-based composite called “Carton” which serves as construction material for their nests. The process by which termites produce Carton is similar to the manufacturing process for electrospun cellulose fibers. Studying how termites produce Carton, a functionally driven material, can inform a design methodology for synthetic production of biomaterials. Here we characterize material composition of Carton by conducting Raman spectroscopy on samples produced by two termite varieties. By leveraging the knowledge accumulated from millenia of evolution we can use nature as a design template for novel material production.

Included in

Biomaterials Commons

Share

COinS
 
Nov 10th, 3:03 PM Nov 10th, 3:15 PM

Biomimetic Cellulose-based Biocomposites

Biological structures such as termite nests, silk worm cocoons and honey bee combs integrate material, structure and form to produce biodegradable polymers and composites. Synthetic production of biomaterials through additive or woven processes has failed to achieve comparable material properties to their natural counterparts. For example, cellulose-based biocomposites have markedly less strength and toughness than cellulose micro and nanofibers found in nature. Termites produce a cellulose-based composite called “Carton” which serves as construction material for their nests. The process by which termites produce Carton is similar to the manufacturing process for electrospun cellulose fibers. Studying how termites produce Carton, a functionally driven material, can inform a design methodology for synthetic production of biomaterials. Here we characterize material composition of Carton by conducting Raman spectroscopy on samples produced by two termite varieties. By leveraging the knowledge accumulated from millenia of evolution we can use nature as a design template for novel material production.