The use of treatment theories and procedures for postural control in adult with hemiplegia: A national survey

Shu-Ling Hwang, Florida International University

Abstract

This study investigated the use of treatment theories and procedures for postural control training used by Occupational Therapists (OTs) when working with hemiplegic adults who have had cerebrovascular accident (CVA) or traumatic brain injury (TBI). The method of data collection was a national survey of 400 randomly selected physical disability OTs with 127 usable surveys returned. Results showed that the most common used treatment theory was neurodevelopmental treatment (NDT), followed by motor relearning program (MRP), proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF), Brunnstrom's approach, and the approach of Rood. The most common treatment posture used was sitting, followed by standing, mat activity, equilibrium reaction training, and walking. The factors affecting the use of various treatment theories procedures were years certified, years of clinical experience, work situation and work status. Pearson correlation coefficient analyses found significant positive relationships between treatment theories and postures. There were significant high correlations between usage of all pairs of treatment procedures. ^

Subject Area

Health Sciences, Occupational Health and Safety|Health Sciences, Rehabilitation and Therapy

Recommended Citation

Hwang, Shu-Ling, "The use of treatment theories and procedures for postural control in adult with hemiplegia: A national survey" (1996). ProQuest ETD Collection for FIU. AAI1383097.
https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/dissertations/AAI1383097

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