Title / Titulo

What Are They Thinking?

Speaker's Country of Origin

USA

Location

Ocean Bank Convocation Center

Start Date

18-5-2018 3:15 PM

End Date

18-5-2018 4:15 PM

Presentation Type / Tipo de propuesta

Featured Presenter

Description / Descripción

Can we know what another person is thinking? Thinking is an invisible enterprise and too often what is articulated is what is perceived to be what is wanted and will gain approval, whether or not that is what the student, teacher, colleague or leader was actually thinking.

In times when students, teachers and schools are constantly being judged by grades students achieve in ways that are readily quantifiable, does this limit both our students’ learning and our knowledge of what students are thinking; the processes they develop when exploring theories and ideas and the open-mindedness and confidence to convey thoughts that are different to those of others?

How can the invisible be made visible? Visible Thinking, developed by Project Zero at Harvard Graduate School of Education provides research-based strategies and structures that enable this and empowers teachers to get to know their students sometimes differently, nurture deeper understanding and greater motivation for learning. Visible Thinking “is a broad and flexible framework for enriching classroom learning in the content areas and fostering students' intellectual development at the same time.”

During this session, experienced Project Zero researchers together with educators who have worked in different contexts with many people including teachers and/or with students of different ages, will share their findings, experiences and insights from research and practice, pictures of practice of incorporating Visible Thinking in various settings including classrooms and schools, processes and personal narratives.

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Event Location

 
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May 18th, 3:15 PM May 18th, 4:15 PM

What Are They Thinking?

Ocean Bank Convocation Center

Can we know what another person is thinking? Thinking is an invisible enterprise and too often what is articulated is what is perceived to be what is wanted and will gain approval, whether or not that is what the student, teacher, colleague or leader was actually thinking.

In times when students, teachers and schools are constantly being judged by grades students achieve in ways that are readily quantifiable, does this limit both our students’ learning and our knowledge of what students are thinking; the processes they develop when exploring theories and ideas and the open-mindedness and confidence to convey thoughts that are different to those of others?

How can the invisible be made visible? Visible Thinking, developed by Project Zero at Harvard Graduate School of Education provides research-based strategies and structures that enable this and empowers teachers to get to know their students sometimes differently, nurture deeper understanding and greater motivation for learning. Visible Thinking “is a broad and flexible framework for enriching classroom learning in the content areas and fostering students' intellectual development at the same time.”

During this session, experienced Project Zero researchers together with educators who have worked in different contexts with many people including teachers and/or with students of different ages, will share their findings, experiences and insights from research and practice, pictures of practice of incorporating Visible Thinking in various settings including classrooms and schools, processes and personal narratives.