Presenter Information / Informacion del presentador

Angie M. Rosati Ms, York UniversityFollow

Speaker's Country of Origin

Canada

Location

RDB 2005

Start Date

18-5-2018 11:45 AM

End Date

18-5-2018 12:45 PM

Presentation Type / Tipo de propuesta

Interactive Workshop / Talleres interactivos

Description / Descripción

How can recent findings from the field of neuroscience regarding the neurophysiological roots of child behaviour be leveraged to inform our efforts to promote emotionally supportive relationships and ultimately student learning in the early years? First, we might train early educators to utilize these neurophysiological findings to rethink child behavior, a key variable in the student-teacher relationship. Second, we might train educators to rethink the importance of emotionally supportive relationships from this same neurophysiological lens.The need to rethink child behavior and student teacher relationships is more critical now than ever before. The rise in educator reported challenging behavior and educator stress is putting increasing strain on these critical relationships and by extension, threatening the early school success of many children. Reframing traditional views of child behavior, especially challenging behavior, using a neurophysiological lens offers the promise of a fresh view of the child and improved prospects for emotionally supportive student-teacher relationships.

Audience / Audiencia

Teachers: Early Childhood / Primera Infancia, Teachers: K-5, Teachers: Middle and High School / Escuela media y secundaria

Available for download on Friday, May 25, 2018

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Event Location

 
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May 18th, 11:45 AM May 18th, 12:45 PM

Rethinking Child Behaviour as a Neurophysiological Phenomenon

RDB 2005

How can recent findings from the field of neuroscience regarding the neurophysiological roots of child behaviour be leveraged to inform our efforts to promote emotionally supportive relationships and ultimately student learning in the early years? First, we might train early educators to utilize these neurophysiological findings to rethink child behavior, a key variable in the student-teacher relationship. Second, we might train educators to rethink the importance of emotionally supportive relationships from this same neurophysiological lens.The need to rethink child behavior and student teacher relationships is more critical now than ever before. The rise in educator reported challenging behavior and educator stress is putting increasing strain on these critical relationships and by extension, threatening the early school success of many children. Reframing traditional views of child behavior, especially challenging behavior, using a neurophysiological lens offers the promise of a fresh view of the child and improved prospects for emotionally supportive student-teacher relationships.