Document Type

Thesis

Degree

Master of Speech Language Pathology (MSSLP)

Department

Speech-Language Pathology

First Advisor's Name

Jean Mead

First Advisor's Committee Title

committee chair

Second Advisor's Name

Monica Hough

Second Advisor's Committee Title

committee member

Third Advisor's Name

Eliane Ramos

Third Advisor's Committee Title

committee member

Keywords

Speech-Language Pathology, Supervision, Supervisors, Interns, Students, Perceptions

Date of Defense

11-13-2015

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to analyze interns’ perceptions of what supervisors considered important supervisory behaviors and to compare those perceptions with what the supervisors considered important. Participants consisted of 33 interns and 23 supervisors. Results of two surveys collected in previous studies were compared and analyzed. Tihen’s (1983) “Tihen’s Student Expectations of their Clinical Supervisor(s) Scale” was used for the intern group. A modified version of the same scale was used for the supervisor group. The scale rated five domains: passive, evaluative, active, cooperative, and affective.

Results revealed that interns ranked perceptions of what supervisors considered important supervisory behaviors as less important than what supervisors rated them. Supervisors rated all domains significantly higher than interns. Both groups considered the active domain to be the most important category and the passive domain to be the least important. Groups differed in their rankings for the affective, evaluative, and cooperative domains.

Identifier

Speech-Language Pathology Interns’ Perceptions of What Supervisors Value Most During Clinical Practicum

Available for download on Sunday, December 03, 2017

Included in

Other Nursing Commons

Share

COinS
 

Rights Statement

Rights Statement

In Copyright. URI: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
This Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).