Document Type

Thesis

Degree

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor's Name

Marilyn Montgomery

First Advisor's Committee Title

Committee Chair

Second Advisor's Name

Jacob Gewirtz

Third Advisor's Name

William Kurtines

Date of Defense

7-25-2005

Abstract

This study is a preliminary exploration of whether parental stress can be influenced by receiving the developmental assessment information about a target child. The study consisted of 25 self-referred families who sought developmental assessments from the Youth and Family Development Program (YFDP) at Florida International University, with children between 4 to 12 years of age. All parents contacting YFDP for developmental assessments completed a pre-test (Parenting Stress Index-Short Form (PSI-SF) over the telephone. Participants (both parent and child) completed an assessment battery during Weeks 1 and 2, and a final feedback session (Week 4) was provided for the parent on the results of these assessments. The participants were contacted four weeks (Week 8) after the feedback session to complete the post test (PSISF). Results of the pre and post-test were compared. As expected, parents' stress was significantly lower at one month following the developmental assessment intervention compared to stress at intake, across domains of parent distress, difficult child, parentchild dysfunction, and total parenting distress. Implications for using developmental assessments in parent interventions are discussed.

Identifier

FI14052553

Comments

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Included in

Psychology Commons

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