Title

Molecular studies in gorgonian alloimmunity : search for gene homologs of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily in Swiftia exserta

Document Type

Thesis

Degree

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Biology

First Advisor's Name

Charles H. Bigger

First Advisor's Committee Title

Committee Chair

Second Advisor's Name

Martin L. Tracey

Third Advisor's Name

Case K. Okubo

Fourth Advisor's Name

David N. Kuhn

Date of Defense

11-26-1991

Abstract

Humoral and cells surface molecules of the mammalian immune system, grouped into the Immunoglobulin Gene Superfamily, share protein structure and gene sequence homologies with molecules found among diverse phylogenetic groups. In histocompatibility studies, the gorgonian coral Swiftia exserta has recently demonstrated specific alloimmunity with memory (Salter-Cid and Bigger, 1991. Biological Bulletin Vol 181). In an attempt to shed light on the origins of this gene family and the evolution of the vertebrate immune response, genomic DNA from Swiftia exserta was isolated, purified, and analyzed by Southern blot hybridization with mouse gene probes corresponding to two molecules of the Immunoglobulin Gene Superfamily, the Thy-1 antigen, and the alpha-3 domain of the MHC Class I histocompatibility marker. Hybridizations were conducted under low to non-stringent conditions to allow binding of mismatched homologs that may exist between the mouse gene probes and the Swiftia DNA. Removal of non-specific binding (sequences less than 70% homologous) occurred in washing steps. Results show that with the probes selected, the method chosen, and the conditions applied, no evidence of sequences of 70% or greater homology to the mouse Thy-1 or MHC Class I alpha-3 genes exist in Swiftia exserta genome.

Identifier

FI14051878

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