A validation study of the construct "jealousy" in eleven- to fourteen-month-old infants: Evidence for its divergence from "fear" and "anger"

Wendy Elizabeth Roth, Florida International University

Abstract

There has been increasing interest in expanding the scope of the study of the "basic" emotions and their development in infancy to include more of the so-called "complex" emotions like jealousy. This dissertation investigated evidence for the divergence of jealousy in infants from both fear and anger, two of the basic emotions said to be precursors and contributors to the emergence of jealousy in the later part of the first year of life. Participants judged how well eight emotion-denoting terms (including jealousy, anger and fear) described infants' emotionality in fear-, anger-, and jealousy-provoking situations in which the social context of the emotion episodes was either included or excluded. Differences within and between participants' judgments of the eight terms in the two context conditions were examined across the three emotion-provoking conditions. Results suggested that infants' emotional behavior denoting jealousy was not judged differently from behavior denoting anger or fear in the absence of contextual information and, that when contextual information was provided, attributions of infant jealousy, anger, and fear were made "correctly" for their respective target emotion conditions. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Developmental

Recommended Citation

Wendy Elizabeth Roth, "A validation study of the construct "jealousy" in eleven- to fourteen-month-old infants: Evidence for its divergence from "fear" and "anger"" (January 1, 1998). ProQuest ETD Collection for FIU. Paper AAI9903258.
http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/dissertations/AAI9903258

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