The usefulness and appropriateness of a federalist perspective as a theoretical construct for the study of government and civics at the secondary level

Robert Gutierrez, Florida International University

Abstract

This dissertation is the formulation of an argument for the incorporation of a liberated federalism perspective as the foundational theoretical construct for the teaching and study of American government and civics at the secondary level. The argument asserts that the history of the nation, in terms of its basic view of government, has developed from a traditional federalist view to a natural rights view. Instruction of government and politics has paralleled that development. The argument further asserts that the current dependence on the natural rights perspective has contributed and helped legitimize, however unintentionally, the excessive levels of individualism, self-absorption, and uncivil behavior that is being experienced in our society today.^ The argumentation follows the dialectic form presented by Hegel of thesis, antithesis, and synthesis. That is, the thesis argues that the traditional federalist perspective would serve as a viable construct for the teaching of government and civics. In this portion of the argument, the republican model of political reality is presented. The antithesis promotes the natural rights perspective and relies on the political systems model for its theoretical approach. Finally, the synthesis argues that a liberated federalism perspective should be the foundational construct. Here, the argument presents its own model as a theoretical construct that is designed to assist teachers and curriculum materials writers in the development of American government and civics lessons and materials. ^

Subject Area

Education, Secondary|Education, Social Sciences|Political Science, General

Recommended Citation

Robert Gutierrez, "The usefulness and appropriateness of a federalist perspective as a theoretical construct for the study of government and civics at the secondary level" (January 1, 1998). ProQuest ETD Collection for FIU. Paper AAI9835826.
http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/dissertations/AAI9835826

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