The applied computer science of economic analyses: Internet prioritization and Internet pricing, and software engineering and software pricing for the mass market

Bernard C Parenteau, Florida International University

Abstract

This research examines evolving issues in applied computer science and applies economic and business analyses as well. There are two main areas. The first is internetwork communications as embodied by the Internet. The goal of the research is to devise an efficient pricing, prioritization, and incentivization plan that could be realistically implemented on the existing infrastructure. Criteria include practical and economic efficiency, and proper incentives for both users and providers. Background information on the evolution and functional operation of the Internet is given, and relevant literature is surveyed and analyzed. Economic analysis is performed on the incentive implications of the current pricing structure and organization. The problems are identified, and minimally disruptive solutions are proposed for all levels of implementation to the lowest level protocol. Practical issues are considered and performance analyses are done. The second area of research is mass market software engineering, and how this differs from classical software engineering. Software life-cycle revenues are analyzed and software pricing and timing implications are derived. A profit maximizing methodology is developed to select or defer the development of software features for inclusion in a given release. An iterative model of the stages of the software development process is developed, taking into account new communications capabilities as well as profitability. ^

Subject Area

Economics, Commerce-Business|Computer Science

Recommended Citation

Bernard C Parenteau, "The applied computer science of economic analyses: Internet prioritization and Internet pricing, and software engineering and software pricing for the mass market" (January 1, 1998). ProQuest ETD Collection for FIU. Paper AAI9821696.
http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/dissertations/AAI9821696

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