The effects of required/sequenced preparatory courses on academic success and retention at a community college

Elizabeth Andrews Brady, Florida International University

Abstract

This dissertation had two purposes: first, to analyze how required sequenced college preparatory courses in mathematics, reading, and writing affect students' academic success and, second, to add to a theoretical model for predicting student retention at a community college. Grade point average, number of degree credits earned, and re-enrollment rate were measured as determinants of academic success. The treatment group had a significantly higher grade point average than the control group. There was no significant difference in the number of degree credits earned or re-enrollment rate for the groups. A series of logistic regressions used the independent variables E-ASSET scores in math, reading, and writing; number of college prep areas required; credits earned; grade point average; students' status; academic restrictions/required course sequencing; sex; race; and socio-economic status to determine the predictor variables for retention. The academic variable that showed the greatest potential as a predictor for retention was grade point average. Overall, receiving financial aid was the greatest predictor for re-enrollment. For a financial aid recipient the odds of re-enrollment were 2.70 times more likely than if no financial aid was received. ^

Subject Area

Education, Community College

Recommended Citation

Elizabeth Andrews Brady, "The effects of required/sequenced preparatory courses on academic success and retention at a community college" (January 1, 1994). ProQuest ETD Collection for FIU. Paper AAI9501595.
http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/dissertations/AAI9501595

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