Self-esteem and job satisfaction of adults with mild mental retardation in sheltered workshops and supported employment programs

David Kenneth Griffin, Florida International University

Abstract

A sample of 200 adults with mild mental retardation were assessed on overall job satisfaction and self-esteem using the Vocational Program Evaluation Profile and the Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory. The subjects worked either in a sheltered workshop or in a supported employment setting. Results indicated that there was a significant relationship between self-esteem and job satisfaction for both groups of subjects. In addition, subjects who worked in supported employment reported significantly higher levels of job satisfaction also. There was also an interaction between place of residence and place of employment when looking at self-esteem; those who live in a semi-independent home and work in supported employment reported the highest levels of self-esteem. These results are discussed in terms of the social validity of supported-employment for persons with mild mental retardation. ^

Subject Area

Education, Tests and Measurements|Education, Special|Psychology, Industrial

Recommended Citation

David Kenneth Griffin, "Self-esteem and job satisfaction of adults with mild mental retardation in sheltered workshops and supported employment programs" (January 1, 1993). ProQuest ETD Collection for FIU. Paper AAI9401930.
http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/dissertations/AAI9401930

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