The effect of the use of computer assisted instruction (CAI) on attitudes and computational scores of developmental mathematics students at two inner city schools with predominantly Black enrollment

John Thayer, Florida International University

Abstract

This study examined the effects of computer assisted instruction (CAI) 1 hour per week for 18 weeks on changes in computational scores and attitudes of developmental mathematics students at schools with predominantly Black enrollment. Comparisons were made between students using CAI with differing software--PLATO, CSR or both together--and students using traditional instruction (TI) only.^ This study was conducted in the Dade County Public School System from February through June 1991, at two senior high schools. The dependent variables, the State Student Assessment Test (SSAT), and the School Subjects Attitude Scales (SSAS), measured students' computational scores and attitudes toward mathematics in 3 categories: interest, usefulness, and difficulty, respectively.^ Univariate analyses of variance were performed on the least squares mean differences from pretest to posttest for testing main effects and interactions. A t-test measured significant main effects and interactions. Results were interpreted at the.01 level of significance.^ Null hypotheses 1, 2, and 3 compared versions of CAI with the control group, for changes in mathematical computation scores measured with the SSAT. It could not be concluded that changes in standardized mathematics test scores of students using CAI with differing software 1 hour per week for 18 class hours combined with TI were significantly higher than changes in test scores for students receiving TI only.^ Null hypotheses 4, 5, and 6 tested the effects of CAI for attitudes toward mathematics for experimental groups against control groups measured with the SSAS. Changes in attitudes toward mathematics of students using CAI with differing software 1 hour per week for 18 class hours combined with TI were not significantly higher than attitude changes for students receiving TI only.^ Teacher effect on students' computational scores was a more influential variable than CAI. No interaction was found between gender and learning method on standardized mathematics test scores (null hypothesis 7). ^

Subject Area

Education, Mathematics|Education, Bilingual and Multicultural|Education, Secondary

Recommended Citation

John Thayer, "The effect of the use of computer assisted instruction (CAI) on attitudes and computational scores of developmental mathematics students at two inner city schools with predominantly Black enrollment" (January 1, 1992). ProQuest ETD Collection for FIU. Paper AAI9231099.
http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/dissertations/AAI9231099

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