Design of a low power -- high temperature heated ceramic sensor to detect halogen gases

Mary Cristina Ruales Ortega, Florida International University

Abstract

The design, construction and optimization of a low power-high temperature heated ceramic sensor to detect leaking of halogen gases in refrigeration systems are presented. The manufacturing process was done with microelectronic assembly and the Low Temperature Cofire Ceramic (LTCC) technique. Four basic sensor materials were fabricated and tested: Li2SiO3, Na2SiO3, K2SiO3, and CaSiO 3. The evaluation of the sensor material, sensor size, operating temperature, bias voltage, electrodes size, firing temperature, gas flow, and sensor life was done. All sensors responded to the gas showing stability and reproducibility. Before exposing the sensor to the gas, the sensor was modeled like a resistor in series and the calculations obtained were in agreement with the experimental values. The sensor response to the gas was divided in surface diffusion and bulk diffusion; both were analyzed showing agreement between the calculations and the experimental values. The sensor with 51.5%CaSiO3 + 48.5%Li 2SiO3 shows the best results, including a stable current and response to the gas. ^

Subject Area

Engineering, Mechanical|Engineering, Materials Science

Recommended Citation

Mary Cristina Ruales Ortega, "Design of a low power -- high temperature heated ceramic sensor to detect halogen gases" (January 1, 2007). ProQuest ETD Collection for FIU. Paper AAI3299206.
http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/dissertations/AAI3299206

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