A comparative study of block scheduling and traditional scheduling on academic achievement

Verena Martin-Carreras, Florida International University

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an alternate day block schedule design (n = 419) versus a traditional six-period schedule design (n = 623) on the academic achievement of the graduating classes in two schools in which the design was used respectively. Academic achievement was measured by (a) two standardized tests: the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test Sunshine State Standards (FCAT-SSS) in mathematics and reading for 9th and 10th grade and the Scholastic Reading Inventory Test (SRI) for 9 th, 10th, and 11th grade; (b) three school grades: the mathematics final course grades for 9th, 10th, and 11th grade, the English final course grades for 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th grade and the graduating GPA.^ A total of five repeated measure analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were conducted to analyze the difference between the two schools (representing the two designs) with respect to five achievement indicators (FCAT-SSS mathematics scores, FCAT-SSS reading scores, SRI scores, mathematics final course grades, and English final course grades). The between-subject factor for the five ANOVAs was the schedule design and the within-subject factor was the time the tests were taken or the time the course grades were issued. T-tests were performed on all eighth grade achievement indicators to ensure there were no significant differences in achievement between the two cohorts prior to entering high school. An independent samples t-test was conducted to analyze the difference between the two schedule designs with respect to graduating GPA.^ Achievement in the alternate day block schedule design was significantly higher than in the traditional six-period schedule design for some of the locally assigned school grades. The difference between the two types of schedule designs was not significant for the standardized measures (the FCAT-SSS in reading and mathematics and the SRI). This study concludes that the use of an alternate day block schedule design can be considered an educational tool that can help improve the academic achievement of students as measured by local indicators of achievement; but, apparently the design is not an important factor in achievement as measured by state examinations such as the FCAT-SSS or the SRI.^

Subject Area

Education, Administration|Education, Secondary|Education, Curriculum and Instruction

Recommended Citation

Martin-Carreras, Verena, "A comparative study of block scheduling and traditional scheduling on academic achievement" (2006). ProQuest ETD Collection for FIU. AAI3249714.
http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/dissertations/AAI3249714

Share

COinS