Anxious children who received treatment grow -up: An 8-to-13 year follow-up study

Lissette Maria Saavedra, Florida International University

Abstract

This dissertation examined the long-term efficacy (8-to-13 years, M = 9.54, SD = 1.689) of exposure-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for phobic and anxiety disorders in youths. Long-term efficacy was examined in terms of diagnostic recovery, symptom reductions, and clinically significant change. This dissertation also examined predictors of long-term efficacy (e.g., age, gender, and other clinical characteristics) as well as the relative long-term efficacy of CBT for Hispanic/Latino and European American youth. ^ Participants consisted of 67 youth (age range 15–26 years; M = 19.43, SD = 3.02 years at time of follow-up assessment), (47.8% females, 37.3% Hispanic/Latino) who had participated in one of two clinical trials (Silverman et al., 1999a, b). After providing informed consent to participate in the long term follow-up, youths completed a diagnostic interview and a battery of questionnaires. Results indicated that treatment gains were maintained about 9.5 years after treatment was completed. Maintenance of treatment gains was evident in terms of diagnostic recovery, symptom reductions, and clinically significant change. Long-term treatment gains extended to both ethnic groups and the two ethnic groups were functionally equivalent along most indices examined. Analyses of predictors of long-term outcome showed that parent self-reported pre-treatment depression, youth-reported pre-treatment depression, and youths retrospective reports of negative life events were significantly associated with less favorable long-term gains in terms of total symptoms of anxiety at long-term follow-up. In terms of long-term sequelae, youths with less successful post-treatment outcomes reported seeking-out additional treatment as well as using/abused substances and substance dependence significantly more than youths with successful post-treatment outcomes. Results are discussed in terms of the contribution of the present study to knowledge base about the long-term efficacy of exposure-based CBT procedures for phobic and anxiety disorders in youth. Findings also are discussed in terms of the need to modify CBT procedures to target youths with less successful post-treatment outcomes. Limitations and future directions are presented. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Developmental|Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Lissette Maria Saavedra, "Anxious children who received treatment grow -up: An 8-to-13 year follow-up study" (January 1, 2005). ProQuest ETD Collection for FIU. Paper AAI3169471.
http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/dissertations/AAI3169471

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