Sibling relations in preadolescence and adolescence: Compensatory and buffering effects

Avidan Milevsky, Florida International University

Abstract

The current study is an examination of how support from siblings relates to psychological and academic well-being in preadolescence and adolescence in general, and the buffering and compensatory effects of sibling support in particular. Participants for the study were 694 African-American, European-American, and Hispanic-American students in grades 6 and 8. Participants were interviewed in school regarding their social support, ecological risk, and psychological well-being. Academic well-being was assessed using teacher reports and school records. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that greater brother support was associated with more positive school attitudes and with higher overall self-esteem. In addition, sister support moderated the relationship between ecological risk and school adaptation. In terms of a compensatory effect, students under low mother support conditions receiving greater support from brothers, and students under low friend support conditions receiving greater support from brothers exhibited higher school achievement. The potential benefits of sibling support warrant a closer examination of the wide ranging issues involved in sibling relations. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Developmental

Recommended Citation

Avidan Milevsky, "Sibling relations in preadolescence and adolescence: Compensatory and buffering effects" (January 1, 2002). ProQuest ETD Collection for FIU. Paper AAI3049785.
http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/dissertations/AAI3049785

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