Acoustic telemetry studies of bonefish (Albula vulpes ) movement around Andros Island, Bahamas: Implications for species management

Vanessa Haley, Florida International University

Abstract

Bonefish (Albula spp.) support an economically important catch-and-release recreational fishery, as well as artisanal harvesting, in The Bahamas. Little is known about the large-scale movement patterns of bonefish, yet such information is essential for proper species conservation and management. ^ I used acoustic telemetry to determine large-scale movement patterns of bonefish around Andros, Bahamas, in conjunction with presumed spawning migrations. I conclude that bonefish travel long distances from shallow flats to pre-spawning aggregation sites in proximity to off-shore reef locations. Off-shore movement to deeper reef locations occurs around both new and full moons. This study has also confirmed anecdotal reports that the North Bight is an important spawning migration corridor for bonefish. ^ This information is critical for the protection of bonefish and identifies important habitats (e.g. migration corridors and pre-spawning aggregations) on Andros that warrant protection from coastal degradation or fishing pressures. ^

Subject Area

Biology, Conservation|Biology, Oceanography|Agriculture, Fisheries and Aquaculture

Recommended Citation

Haley, Vanessa, "Acoustic telemetry studies of bonefish (Albula vulpes ) movement around Andros Island, Bahamas: Implications for species management" (2009). ProQuest ETD Collection for FIU. AAI1478724.
http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/dissertations/AAI1478724

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