Trojan horses: On the origins of national security concerns over foreign investments in the United States from 1919 to 2008

Felipe Mendes Sozzi Miguel, Florida International University

Abstract

In this thesis I sought to explain the origins of national security concerns over foreign investments in the United States from 1919 to 2008. I identified and examined 29 cases of national security concerns over foreign investments in the United States during that period, and argued that in order to understand the circumstances under which foreign investments in the United States are perceived to be threats to the U.S. security we must rely on a combination of democratic peace theory and the version of political realism known as power transition theory. Thus, I tested the argument that national security concerns over foreign investments in the United States from 1919 to 2008 resulted from: (1) perceptions of international power transition, (2) perceptions of ideological and institutional differences between the United States and the home country of the investor, (3) perceptions of the strategic importance of the sector where the investment is made, and (4) perceptions of participation or control of the foreign investor by the government of the country of origin. I found that all these hypotheses have some explanatory power. ^

Subject Area

History, United States|Political Science, International Law and Relations

Recommended Citation

Felipe Mendes Sozzi Miguel, "Trojan horses: On the origins of national security concerns over foreign investments in the United States from 1919 to 2008" (January 1, 2009). ProQuest ETD Collection for FIU. Paper AAI1471644.
http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/dissertations/AAI1471644

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