A comparative study of perceptions about social relations between black Caribbean nationals and African Americans in a black institution

Max C. E Orezzoli, Florida International University

Abstract

The present study researched how first-generation black national Caribbean groups and native born black Americans perceived each other socially within an African American institution. Each group rated the other group on items dealing with perceived social relations. Two black ethnically-distinct communities totaling 151 participants were studied. Chi-square ($\chi\sp2$) and one-way analyses of variances (ANOVAs) were employed to test the collected data. The study yielded results about the researched groups that supported both the major findings in the review literature and the thesis's hypothesis; namely, that black Caribbean nationals tend to perceive that they relate socially more with their own group than with African Americans even as mutual participants in a monoracial institution. The present study was unique, as it incorporated a multinational Caribbean group and an African American group that the literature has not previously researched together, and especially as it surveyed these two groups in the context of a black-owned institution. ^

Subject Area

Black Studies|Psychology, Social|Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies

Recommended Citation

Orezzoli, Max C. E, "A comparative study of perceptions about social relations between black Caribbean nationals and African Americans in a black institution" (1998). ProQuest ETD Collection for FIU. AAI1391842.
http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/dissertations/AAI1391842

Share

COinS